Home Know Your Rights RIGHT TO PROTEST FOR OUR RIGHTS

RIGHT TO PROTEST FOR OUR RIGHTS

                                                   

INTRODUCTION

India is a democratic country and we have the most comprehensive and written Constitution available to protect the rights of citizens. The Fundamental Right given in Article 32 of the Constitution may be considered as the protector of the Fundamental Rights of citizens.  In addition, The Right to protest peacefully is enshrined in the Indian Constitution—Article 19(1)(a) guarantees the freedom of speech and expression; Article 19(1)(b) assures citizens the right to assemble peaceably and without arms. Article 19(2) imposes reasonable restrictions on the right to assemble peaceably and without arms.


These reasonable restrictions are imposed in the interests of the sovereignty and integrity of India, the security of the State, friendly relations with foreign States, public order, decency or morality or in relation to contempt of court, defamation or incitement to an offence.

The Right to free speech and expression transforms into the right to freely express an opinion on the conduct of the government. The Right to the association is required to form associations for political purposes — for instance, to collectively challenge the government decisions and to even aim, peacefully and legally, to displace the government, to not merely check abuse of power but to wrest power. The Right to peaceably assemble allows political parties and citizenship bodies such as university-based student groups to question and object to acts of the government by demonstrations, agitations, and public meetings, to launch sustained protest movements. Democracies everywhere are founded on two core political rights.


The first, the right of every citizen to freely elect their government and when dissatisfied with its performance, to vote it out of power in a legitimately held election (Article 326). Any form of public action to challenge the government’s proposals or decisions is also constitutionally legitimate, as long as it is done peacefully. Any arbitrary restraint on the exercise of such rights — for instance, imposing Section 144 — shows the inability of the government to tolerate dissent.

In Ramlila Maidan Incident v. Home Secretary, Union of India & Ors. case (2012), the Apex Court had stated, “Citizens have a fundamental right to assembly and peaceful protest which cannot be taken away by an arbitrary executive or legislative action.”

Public Protest in India: Historical Context

The background of the Indian Constitution is formed by its anti-colonial struggle, within which the seeds of a political public sphere and democratic Constitution were sown.
The people of India fought hard and long to publicly express their views on colonial policies and laws, to dissent from them, to shape minds and form a public opinion against them, to speak to and against the government, to challenge it.

People not only signed writ petitions but also staged dharnas, held large public meetings, peaceful protests and demonstrations and even, for instance in Gandhi’s satyagraha, launched civil disobedience movements.

Protests have also offered points of inclusion and participation to the voices that are not part of the mainstream as seen in the protests for the creation of Andhra or the famous ‘Chipko movement’.

Protests: Making Public as the Watchdog of the Government

People act as watchdogs and constantly monitor governments’ acts, which provides feedback to the governments about their policies and actions. A s a result, the concerned government, through consultation, meetings, and discussion, recognizes and rectifies its mistakes. This cluster of inter-related political rights (expression, association, assembly, petition, and protest) is meant to ensure that even when the government works in our interests, we don’t sit back and allow it to conduct business as usual.

If an elected government strays from the constitutional course, goes against the interests of the people, becomes unresponsive or refuses to listen, then in that case, pressure against the government must be built by still stronger public methods. Protests may take the form of street assemblies — the occasional, temporary gathering of a group to parade or demonstrate or become a sustained movement, necessary to complement or reinforce more conventional forms of politics.

However, resorting to violence during the protest is a violation of a key fundamental duty of citizens. Enumerated in Article 51(A) the Constitution makes it a fundamental duty of every citizen “to safeguard public property and to abjure violence”

Also read about The Rights of an Arrested person in India

 CONCLUSION

We all know that the Non-Cooperation Movement and Satyagarah movement proved to be effective to cast away the Britishers from India and this clearly shows the true power and significance of protests in a democracy.

The right of citizens to protest and gather peacefully without arms is a fundamental aspect of India’s democracy. While it is also the obligation of the government to protect civilians from violent protests, certain essential principles need to be kept in mind. The Right to protest is one of the fundamental principles on which democracy survives and thrives. However, when a protest turns violent, as seen in some places in recent times, it defeats the very purpose of the protest. While enjoying the rights, one must also fulfill their duties and responsibilities in a democratic society.

This article is written by Kush Bhardwaj and edited by Rupreet Kaur Dhariwal.

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